Filtered Drinking Water: Your Water Can Taste Better!

A few months ago, we sang the praises of “whole house filter systems,” and we still believe this to be a worthwhile endeavor.  Whole house filtering cleans up water before it gets to your water-using appliances like dish washers, water heaters, furnaces, and washing machines. Adding such a filter will add years to the lives of these big ticket items.

Many homeowners and apartment dwellers alike, however, want a dedicated filter just for drinking water. There are several ways to go about this. You can buy pitchers or jugs with filters installed, and there are filters that attach to your faucets. All refrigerators that have drinking water dispensers and ice makers in them also have filters installed. There’s also the many forms of bottled water. You will see these large dispensers mostly in commercial settings, but some people have them in homes as well.

Any kind of filter, including whole house filters, will require the owner to keep up with the element or cartridge changes to ensure that flow and efficiency are both maintained.

Pitchers

There are several filtered water pitchers or jugs to choose from. They usually hold anywhere from a quart of water to a few gallons. The size you buy hinges on four main factors: the weight of the container when it’s full, how much space you’re willing to surrender in the refrigerator, what the thing actually looks like, and how often you want to refill it.

There are many well-known brands to choose from including Brita and Pur, and there’s a newer brand that actually takes pitcher aesthetics into consideration, called Soma.

I don’t believe there to be many real drawbacks to such systems; however, you do need to stay on top of cleaning so that mold and bacteria don’t start to grow on some of the surfaces.

Filters Installed At The Faucet

Filters installed at faucets can be further broken down into two categories: filters installed on the end of the faucet stem, and filters installed under the counter before the water reaches the faucet.

Filters installed onto the faucet stem may be the easiest filters to install and maintain. They are light weight, thread right onto the stem, and will let you know when they need changing (some have indicators and a slow flow is a pretty good hint, as well). Another selling point to stem-installed filters is that they filter both hot and cold water.

For more information about filtered drinking water. Click here.

Twin Plumbers: Hiring a Plumber in Southern California or Arizona

Here at the Plumbing Circle, we strive to help consumers get the most bang for their buck when it comes to plumbing issues. To that end, we’ve built a vast library of articles explaining plumbing theory and processes—both why’s and how’s, plumbing news, with some humor mixed in as well. Sometimes though, even seasoned do-it-yourself-ers, with all of the information that the World Wide Web has to offer, need to call in professionals.

What It Means to Be a Professional

While a professional plumber is the guy who is going to pull you out of a sticky situation (to put it mildly), he’s also a person who has put in a lot of time in the classroom—and in the books—to learn how to help your family stay safe and healthy. A good plumber will give you a good estimate, a fair price, and a very good overview of what the particular job entails. He’ll know and be able to tell you what kinds of things could go wrong, and how much extra it will cost to right those wrongs.

References and Credentials

First off, if a plumber or any other type of contractor comes to your door without being asked ahead of time, there is a good chance a scam is in order. Ask them to leave, then call the police and report the incident. Even if they are on the level, you only need to talk to contractors that you’ve asked to talk to.

When you do decide to call a plumber, ask people that you trust who they’ve hired and what their experiences were.  Go online and check out the local Better Business Bureau, and your state’s consumer protection website, looking for reviews both good and bad. Use sites like Bing and Google to look up plumbers in your area, and after you’ve settled on a few names, put those names in the search engines to see if any complaints or citations have been lodged in their direction.

Make sure any plumbers that you call have licenses, certifications, and credentials, and that they allow you to see them.

The Plumbing Circle is also another very valuable resource. Our growing nationwide database of plumbers have been vetted to ensure that only the best plumbers are included.

Technology And Neatness Count

If a plumber that you call shows up in a ratty old truck and is already dirty before the work begins, a red flag should go up in your head.

For more information about plumbing home services. Click here.